Recent Bird Sightings at Fermilab


See the following link information concerning the Current Status of Access to Fermilab

Entries from past months
Year List: Contains the list of birds seen so far this year.
Seasonal List: The list of birds recorded on site at this time of year.

Friday, April 15, 2022

continued from April 14: There were 2 Sharp-shinned Hawks, a Cooper's Hawk and a fourth in the distance (a possible falcon). The most interesting sighting was watching a Pied-billed Grebe trying to disable and swallow a bullhead that was clearly too large for him. Unfortunately, the grebe drifted into the reeds after about 5 minutes before the story ended. Other highlight sightings included: a Great Egret, Turkey Vultures, a Northern Harrier, a Bald Eagle (in the center of the Main Ring, then by the nest), an American Kestrel, a Brown Creeper, a Ruby-crowned Kinglet, a Brown Thrasher and an Eastern Towhee. Dave

Thursday, April 14, 2022

Despite the extremely windy conditions (20-30 mph with gusts in the mid 40s) some interesting sightings were made. First, all 3 Osprey nests are now being brooded. Waterfowl season is rapidly winding down as witnessed in both quality and quantity this morning. Waterfowl found included: Canada Geese, Wood Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall, Mallard, Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Duck and Hooded Merganser. Several migrating hawks were spotted together in flight.

Monday, April 11, 2022

Denis reported some nice birds this morning including Wilson's Snipe, Horned Lark, Vesper Sparrow and Savannah Sparrow (new for year). The best was a flock of about 20 Bonaparte's Gulls flying over the Lab. Dave

Friday, April 8, 2022

Even though the weather was poor (rain, sleet, snow and late morning wind), the bird activity was quite good. Smaller numbers of waterfowl did produce Canada Geese, Wood Ducks, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shovelers, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallards, Green-winged Teal, Redheads, Ring-necked Ducks, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Common Merganser and Ruddy Ducks. All 6 Osprey were accounted for, but there were no signs of brooding (we must have been fooled last week). Sparrows were at their best for the year so far but still with low numbers. Those found were American Tree Sparrows, Vesper Sparrow, Fox Sparrows, Song Sparrows, Swamp Sparrows and Dark-eyed Juncos. Other highlights included: Pied-billed Grebes, American Coots, Sandhill Cranes, Double-crested Cormorants (about 50 on Lake Law), a Northern Harrier, a Bald Eagle (standing on the edge of the new nest, then flew off), a Barred Owl, a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, American Kestrels, Winter Wrens, Golden-crowned Kinglets, Hermit Thrushes, Eastern Meadowlarks, Rusty Blackbirds and a Yellow-rumped Warbler (most likely the first migrant warbler of the year). Dave

Sunday, April 3, 2022

We had some good birds to add to Friday's list for the first week of April. We had not seen the Bald Eagle on the nest for some time. At one time it had appeared to be brooding on the original nest. Today one of the pair was on the newer nest. It flew off, returned with a large branch, and worked for some time finding its proper position. At Osprey Nest 2, one of the birds was seen carrying a large bass. It flew to a tree then started ripping it apart. Other bird highlights included Great Egrets (first of year), Turkey Vultures, a Northern Harrier, a Belted Kingfisher, a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, American Kestrels, Winter Wrens and Fox Sparrows. Dave

Friday, April 1, 2022

We had some great birds this morning starting with the best, a Cinnamon Teal, that Peter only had a brief look at through his scope. He also had a Barred Owl when entering the Lab. Another really good bird was a Common Loon on Lake Law. Good news on the Osprey front as all three pair are at their respective nests. In addition, it appears the Nest 3 female has already started brooding. Note: this was the first pair to return to the Lab (last week). There were a number of misses in the waterfowl sightings. Those found were Canada Geese, Wood Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall, Mallard, Redhead, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Hooded Merganser, Common Merganser and Red-breasted Merganser. Other highlights for the morning were: Pied-billed Grebe, Horned Grebe (probably the same bird as last week), American Coot, Sandhill Cranes (several calling and flying), a Turkey Vulture, a Belted Kingfisher, American Kestrel, Eastern Phoebes, Tree Swallows, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Fox Sparrows and a Swamp Sparrow. Dave

Friday, March 25, 2022

There were not a large number of waterfowl around the Lab today, but diversity remains good. Found in various lakes and ponds around the lab were Canada Geese, Mute Swans (pair on M.Ring Lake), Wood Ducks, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shovelers, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallards, Redheads (most plentiful species today), Ring-necked Ducks, Lesser Scaup, a Hooded Merganser, Common Mergansers and a Red-breasted Merganser (again in Casey's Pond). The two best birds of the morning were a Horned Grebe (Main Ring Lake) and a Winter Wren (Big Woods) both firsts of the year. A Red-tailed Hawk was sitting on a nest in the Buffalo Savannah. All three Osprey's nests are know accounted for, at least partially. Nest 1 had one Osprey on the nest, Nest 2 also had one Osprey on the nest, while Nest 3 had both Ospreys present. Reconstruction was being conducted on all three nests. Other highlights were American Coots, a Pied-billed Grebe, Sandhill Cranes (Main Ring), a Turkey Vulture, a Barred Owl, an American Kestrel, Eastern Phoebes and Golden-crowned Kinglets. As a last note, all the expected woodpeckers were extremely active in all woodlots visited this morning. Wally also added the first swallow of the year, a Tree Swallow, as well as a Red-breasted Nuthatch and a Yellow-rumped Warbler. Dave

Wednesday, March 23, 2022

My first day back in the lab in over a year was a great kick-off to a return to monitoring. Lake Logo had a large float of American Coot and a beaver. The north end of Main Ring Lake was covered in ducks with hundreds of Ring-necked Duck joined by Redhead, Canvasback, American Wigeon, Gadwall, Common Merganser, Pied-billed Grebe, Greater White-fronted Goose, Lesser Scaup and a single Greater Scaup. A pair of Mute Swans have stuck around for a few days. A pair of Sandhill Crane stood in the cattails on the west shoreline. A Ruddy Duck was found on Lake Law, Northern Shovelers were found on AE Sea, and a pair of Red-breasted Merganser continue on Casey's Pond. Besides the waterfowl, other great finds were an adult and an immature Bald Eagle flying overhead, A woodcock was found in the sparrow hedge, as were Purple Finch, Fox Sparrow, and White-throated Sparrow. A Northern Shrike was found in the center of the Main Ring, and a Horned Lark was found on Inner-ring Road. I located the previously reported adult Osprey, on the pole adjacent to nest 1. One last neat note; two Kestrel nests were observed, the one on in the nest box on North Eola and one in a natural tree cavity near the security office. Glenn - Donna added Double-crested Cormorant (Casey's Pond) and Northern Harrier (Eola) also during the third week. Dave

Saturday, March 19, 2022

Weather was not great but bearable for some birding in the light rain for Denis and me. The biggest news of the morning was the return of the first Osprey for the year. This tied the previous earliest record for the return of an Osprey to the Lab. It is most likely a Nest 1 bird since it was very close to Nest 1 when we spotted it. Waterfowl continue to be the most prevalent family of birds in the Lab with: Canada Geese, Mute Swans (pr), Wood Ducks, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallards, Northern Shovelers, Redheads (small number), Ring-necked Ducks (most numerous species again), Bufflehead, a Hooded Merganser and Common Mergansers. Other highlights included American Coot, Sandhill Cranes, a Great Blue Heron, a Northern Harrier, Eastern Bluebirds and Eastern Meadowlarks. Dave

Wednesday, March 16, 2022

The bird of the morning was a late Northern Shrike found in the Garden Club. A close runner-up for the bird of the day was a triplet of Red-breasted Mergansers (2 males and 1 female). Other waterfowl included Canada Goose, Wood Duck, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, Green-winged Teal, Canvasback, Redhead, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Hooded Merganser and Common Merganser. A Red-tailed Hawk appeared to be down in the grass on some prey, when a resident pair of red tails spotted the intruder and quickly chased it off. Additional highlights included: American Coots, Sandhill Cranes, Turkey Vulture, Bald Eagle, Barred Owl, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Eastern Bluebird, Fox Sparrows and Eastern Meadowlarks. Denis, in the Lab for other business, added a Northern Harrier and Horned Larks. Dave

Wednesday, March 9, 2022

This morning was a typical March waterfowl search. Those found included Canada Goose, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, Redhead, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Common Goldeneye, Hooded Merganser and Common Merganser. The bird(s) of the day were a pair of Barred Owls. Another interesting observation was watching an American Kestrel, apparently defending his nest box area, repeatedly dive bombing a Red-tailed Hawk until the hawk left the area. Other highlight birds found during the morning were: American Coots, a pair of Sandhill Cranes in the Village (the male was practicing its breeding dance), an adult Bald Eagle (perched in the Main Ring), a Great Horned Owl, a Hairy Woodpecker, Horned Larks, Song Sparrows, a Fox Sparrow and Common Grackles. Dave

Tuesday, March 8, 2022

Wally tallied a nice list of waterfowl for the first week of March. Included on his list were Greater White-fronted, Canada Goose, Mute Swan, Wood Duck, Northern Shoveler, Mallard, Northern Pintail, Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, Common Goldeneye, Hooded Merganser and Common Merganser. Other highlights in a week where Wally, admittedly, didn't get out much, included American Kestrel, Horned Lark, Eastern Bluebird and the first Common Grackles of the year. Dave

Friday, March 4, 2022

My first trip to the Lab in quite some time was quite interesting. Waterfowl were quite diverse, but I missed the variety of geese found last week by Wally and Donna. Waterfowl found included: Mute Swan, Canada Goose, Northern Shoveler, Mallard, Redhead, Ring-necked Duck, Common Goldeneye, Hooded Merganser and Common Merganser. My favorite birds of the morning were a Sharp-shinned Hawk and a, first of the year and right on schedule, Eastern Meadowlark. Other birds of mention were an American Coot, Bald Eagles (1-adult and 1-immature), a pair of Great Horned Owls, an American Kestrel and Eastern Bluebirds. Donna also added some first-of-the-year Wood Ducks. Dave

Monday, February 28, 2022

Wally stated that the waterfowl numbers and variety picked up quite a bit over the past week or so. "I saw 5 snow geese today and who knows how many Greater White-fronted Geese." Other waterfowl included: Cackling Goose, Canada Goose, Northern Shoveler, Mallard, Redhead, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Common Goldeneye, Hooded Merganser and Common Merganser. The first Sandhill Cranes of the year, a pair, were found in A.E. Sea. The remaining highlights for the week were Northern Harrier (a hunting male), Red-tailed Hawk, American Kestrel, Brown Creeper and Eastern Bluebird. He had a final comment about another new bird for the year, "I noticed several pigeons ( Rock Pigeon) congregating around Wilson Hall today; I believe a pretty sure sign that the Peregrine Falcons have not been roosting in the vicinity for some time." Donna also commented on finding the Greater White-fronted Geese, a Northern Harrier and a Bald Eagle (by Casey's Pond). Dave

Monday, February 21, 2022

Wally reported that the waterfowl didn't appear to be migrating with much variety this week. Those found were Canada Goose, Mallard, Redhead, Common Goldeneye and Common Merganser. Raptors for the week included Bald Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk and American Kestrel. This is the sixth week in a row a Red-breasted Nuthatch was found in the Lab. While his bird of the week was the first Yellow-rumped Warbler of the year in the Lab. Dave

Monday, February 14, 2022

Wally reported: "As the snow has been melting, waterfowl has been showing up in slightly higher numbers." Still the diversity remains low with Canada Goose, Mallard, Redheads (firsts of the year found in the Main Injector Moats), Common Goldeneye and Common Merganser found. His best sighting of the week was a Barred Owl in the Big Woods. He also added a Great Horned Owl. Additional finds included Belted Kingfisher, Hairy Woodpecker, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Brown Creeper, Eastern Bluebird, American Tree Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco and White-throated Sparrow. Dave

Monday, February 7, 2022

As Wally stated, "A few new species of waterfowl have appeared and also on warm days I am hearing more bird songs, so spring is just around the corner". The week's list included: Canada Goose, Mallard, Ring-necked Duck, Bufflehead, Common Goldeneye and Common Merganser. Still his bird of the week was one of our winter species, a Common Redpoll. The expected woodpeckers were found including: Red-bellied Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker and Northern Flicker. Unfortunately, the Pileated Woodpecker was not relocated. Another great bird for the week and, in this case a first for the year, was a Northern Shrike in the Sparrow Hedge. Additional highlights for the first week of February were: Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, American Kestrel, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Eastern Bluebird, Cedar Waxwing and White-throated Sparrow. Dave

Monday, January 31, 2022

Wally located a Pileated Woodpecker in the Big Woods this week. This was the first sighting of this species in the Lab. The same highlight waterfowl, Common Goldeneye and Common Merganser, were still present in some open water areas. Birds of prey sightings were again impressive with Northern Harrier, Bald Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk and Rough-legged Hawk being found. It is noteworthy that this last species, Rough-legged Hawk, has been seen each week of the new year. Other birds of note were Northern Flicker, Red-breasted Nuthatch, White-breasted Nuthatch and White-throated Sparrow. Dave

Sunday, January 23, 2022

Wally reported another week with Raptors being his main highlights, although with a smaller variety this time. The pair of Bald Eagles were found near their nest. Also, he had a Rough-legged Hawk for a third straight week, an American Kestrel and the expected Red-tailed Hawks. The expected winter divers, Common Goldeneye and Common Merganser, were still found in the Lab. The remaining birds of note included Northern Flicker, Red-breasted Nuthatch, White-breasted Nuthatch, Eastern Bluebird, and White-throated Sparrow. Dave

Sunday, January 16, 2022

Wally's week was highlighted with a fantastic list of Birds of Prey. The list included Northern Harrier, Sharp-shinned Hawk, Cooper's Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk, Rough-legged Hawks (a dark morph, most likely the same bird found last week, and a light morph), Great Horned Owl and American Kestrel (he added several Kestrels were observed throughout the week). Donna also reported seeing a Northern Harrier early in the week. Other notable birds on Wally's list were Common Goldeneye, Common Merganser, Belted Kingfisher, Red-breasted Nuthatch, White-breasted Nuthatch, Brown Creeper, Eastern Bluebird and Cedar Waxwing. Dave

Friday, January 7, 2022

Waterfowl for the first week of the year were easy to find, Wally reported, as they were now concentrated in the small areas of open water. Those found were Canada Goose, Mallard, Common Goldeneye and Common Merganser, the expected winter waterfowl species. His birds of the week were a dark morph Rough-legged Hawk (found on 2 separate days) and a female Purple Finch at the Roads and Grounds Feeders. Other highlights for the week included Horned Lark, Eastern Bluebird and White-throated Sparrow. Dave

Friday, December 31, 2021

Wally said he had no real exciting highlight birds for this last week of the year. His best were a Swamp Sparrow and an Eastern Bluebird. Interestingly, he noticed many American Tree Sparrows in some locations. He stated they were mainly sitting along the edges of the Kirk Road prairies and seemed to be feeding on Indian grass seeds. Other interesting birds for the week were Common Goldeneye, Common Merganser, Northern Harrier and American Kestrel. Dave

Saturday, December 18, 2021

Since the Lab is still closed down to all but employees and selected workers, the only birders allowed to conduct this year's Christmas Bird Count were Wally and Donna, both employees of the Lab. With only two birders covering the entire Lab, numbers were understandably below recent averages. The species count was 38 but included some very nice birds. Highlight water birds included Common Goldeneye (9), Hooded Merganser (7), Common Merganser (84), Sandhill Crane (140) and Great Blue Heron (1). Raptors were well represented by Northern Harrier (3), Bald Eagle (2), Red-tailed Hawk (10), Great Horned Owl (3), Short-eared Owl (1) and American Kestrel (2). Sparrows found were American Tree Sparrow (20), Dark-eyed Junco (89), White-throated Sparrow (4) and Swamp Sparrow (1). Other interesting highlights of the day included Belted Kingfisher (1), Hairy Woodpecker (1), Northern Flicker (9), Brown Creeper (1), Eastern Bluebird (5), Cedar Waxwing (1) and Yellow-rumped Warbler (4). Also found during the week but outside the count period was a Cooper's Hawk. Dave

Friday, November 19, 2021

Wally's highlight birds of the week were 3 Tundra Swans in Lake Law. Other waterfowl for the week included: Canada Goose, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall, Mallard, Northern Pintail, Green-winged Teal, Common Goldeneye, Hooded Merganser and Common Merganser. Other birds found during the week included: Pied-billed Grebe, Sandhill Crane, Cooper's Hawk, Bald Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk, American Kestrel and Cedar Waxwing. Dave

Friday, November 12, 2021

Wally reported that the water levels at A.E. Sea are approaching normal levels. This is probably why his list of waterfowl this week was quite impressive. His list consisted of: Greater White-fronted Goose, Canada Goose, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, Northern Pintail, Green-winged Teal, Hooded Merganser and Common Merganser. No American Coots were found. Wally mentioned that it appeared their numbers were down this year. His bird of the week may have been Winter Wrens, one of my favorites. Other birds found were Killdeer, Double-crested Cormorant, Great Blue Heron, Bald Eagle and American Kestrel. Dave

Friday, November 5, 2021

Another nice, late-fall list was provided by Wally. The highlight of the week was a Short-eared Owl flushed in the Main Ring. This was the earliest fall sighting at the Lab in over 20 years. The go-to family again this week was waterfowl, topped by 4 species of geese. The list of waterfowl included: Snow Goose, Greater White-fronted Goose, Cackling Goose, Canada Goose, Wood Duck, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall, Mallard, Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Duck, Hooded Merganser and Ruddy Duck. Wally commented on another interesting sighting. "My 'feel bad' moment of the week was that I saw a lone Tree Swallow at Sea of Evanescence on Friday. I don't feel that it had much to feed on. Hopefully it migrates soon!" Also, this was the latest Tree Swallow sighting in the Lab. Other interesting birds for the week were: Pied-billed Grebe, American Coot, Sandhill Crane, Killdeer, Double-crested Cormorant, Great Blue Heron, Northern Harrier, Bald Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk, Barred Owl, American Kestrel, Horned Lark, Eastern Bluebird, Cedar Waxwing, American Tree Sparrow, Fox Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco, White-throated Sparrow, Common Grackle and Yellow-rumped Warbler. Dave

Friday, October 29, 2021

Wally provided a very nice list of waterfowl for the last week of October but, as he stated, "Water levels are still very low, so waterfowl are getting more diverse but in low numbers". His waterfowls list included: Cackling Goose, Canada Goose, Wood Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, American Black Duck, Northern Pintail, Green-winged Teal and Hooded Merganser. Although the trend at this time of year is leaning toward waterfowl highlights, the bird of the week was an early Snow Bunting found on a gravel road inside the Main Ring. Still highlights from other families are still being found around the Lab. Wally's other finds for the last week of October were: Pied-billed Grebe, American Coot, Sandhill Crane, Lesser Yellowlegs, Northern Harrier, Cooper's Hawk, Bald Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Eastern Bluebird, Cedar Waxwing, Fox Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco, White-throated Sparrow, Song Sparrow, Eastern Meadowlark, Red-winged Blackbird, Brown-headed Cowbird, Common Grackle and Yellow-rumped Warbler. Dave

Friday, October 22, 2021

Even though Wally's best represented family of birds during the third week of October was sparrows, most other families produced some striking highlights. The impressive list of sparrows included Field Sparrow, Fox Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco, White-crowned Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, Savanna Sparrow, Song Sparrow, Lincoln's Sparrow and Swamp Sparrow. Cackling Goose highlighted the waterfowl list followed by Canada Goose, Wood Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Mallard and Ruddy Duck. Both Pied-billed Grebes and Horned Grebes (3) were found on Lake Law. The Blackbird family was represented by Eastern Meadowlark, Red-winged Blackbird, Common Grackle and, best of all, a flock of Rusty Blackbirds (in the A.E. Sea area). As far as Waders go, Great Blue Herons and Great Egrets were found as expected, but the highlight of the week was finding Cattle Egrets (3) following the bison. Other interesting birds included American Coot, Sandhill Crane, Double-crested Cormorant, Turkey Vulture, Northern Harrier, Cooper's Hawk, Bald Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk, American Kestrel, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Winter Wren (another high-quality bird), Eastern Bluebird, Palm Warbler and Yellow-rumped Warbler. Dave

Friday, October 15, 2021

Wally's list this week included some birds sighted on the "eBird Big Day" Oct. 9th, with the help of Donna. Waterfowl still dominate the list with Greater White-fronted Goose as the highlight of the list. Others found were: Canada Goose, Wood Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, Northern Pintail, Green- winged Teal and Ruddy Duck. All 5 of the Fermi woodpeckers were found including: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker and Northern Flicker. Raptors, again, were well represented with: Turkey Vulture, Northern Harrier, Cooper's Hawk, Bald Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk and American Kestrel. Other sightings from a very impressive middle of October list were: Pied- billed Grebe, American Coot, Sandhill Crane, Killdeer, Wilson's Snipe, Greater Yellowlegs, Lesser Yellowlegs, Eastern Phoebe, Tree Swallow, House Wren, Winter Wren, Marsh Wren, Eastern Bluebird, Cedar Waxwing, Field Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow, Song Sparrow, Lincoln's Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Eastern Towhee, Eastern Meadowlark, Brown-headed Cowbird, Common Grackle, Tennessee Warbler (a stunned bird in the road, apparently struck by a car), Nashville Warbler, and Palm Warbler. Dave

Friday, October 8, 2021

It's that time of year when waterfowl become the dominate family of birds sighted. However, other families are usually represented but more sparingly. Wally's waterfowl list for the first week of October included: Canada Goose, Wood Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, Green-winged Teal and Ruddy Duck. Raptors, also later migrants, were also well represented with: Turkey Vulture, Northern Harrier, Cooper's Hawk, Bald Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk and American Kestrel. Other notable birds found included: Pied-billed Grebe, American Coot, Killdeer, Lesser Yellowlegs, House Wren, Marsh Wren, Gray Catbird, Eastern Bluebird, Song Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow and Palm Warbler. Dave

Friday, October 1, 2021

From Wally's report for the last week of Sept. and into Oct., there appears to be a transition from the early migrants into the later migrants. This is evident from the reduction of shorebirds and warblers to an increase in sparrows and waterfowl. Even though there has been a degradation in the shorebird habitat at A.E. Sea, Wally came up with Killdeer, Pectoral Sandpiper, Solitary Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs and Lesser Yellowlegs. Warblers found around the Lab included Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Palm Warbler and Yellow-rumped Warbler. Wally didn't mention waterfowl numbers but I'm assuming their numbers are on the increase. Waterfowl found were Canada Goose, Wood Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Mallard and Green-winged Teal. Sparrow species increased and included Dark-eyed Junco, Song Sparrow, Lincoln's Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow and Eastern Towhee (not a sparrow but close). Note - this was the first and only Dark-eyed Junco of the season, thus far. Other interesting birds found during this period were Pied-billed Grebe, Black-crowned Night-Heron, Turkey Vulture, Sharp-shinned Hawk, Cooper's Hawk, Bald Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk, American Kestrel, Eastern Wood-Pewee, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Marsh Wren, Eastern Bluebird, Cedar Waxwing and Rose-breasted Grosbeak. Dave

Friday, September 24, 2021

Wally reported that this week's birding was mostly about shorebirds. With great shorebird habitat at A.E. Sea, the best numbers of these birds in many years are being found. This week's list included Killdeer, Baird's Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper, Pectoral Sandpiper, Wilson's Snipe, Spotted Sandpiper, Solitary Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs and Lesser Yellowlegs. According to Wally most species had multiple individuals. No other family dominated the week's list, still many good birds were found. The list included: Wood Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Green-winged Teal, Pied-billed Grebe, Chimney Swift, Sora, Sandhill Crane, Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, Green Heron, Black-crowned Night-Heron, Turkey Vulture, Osprey, Cooper's Hawk, Bald Eagle (perched below nest), Red-tailed Hawk, Belted Kingfisher, American Kestrel, Tree Swallow, Barn Swallow, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Marsh Wren, Eastern Bluebird, Cedar Waxwing, Song Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Eastern Meadowlark, American Redstart, Palm Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler and Rose-breasted Grosbeak. Dave

HOME